Science

Learn more about the lastest science and research that supports our conservation efforts by reading the following published work or reading more about our Scientific Approach.

MODELING POTENTIAL BROADSCALE WILDLIFE MOVEMENT PATHWAYS WITHIN THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES Dr. David M. Theobald2; Dr. Michael Soulé. A new conservation planning tool addresses climate change...Read more.

CLIMATE CHANGE AND CONNECTIVITY:Toward a Strategy for Nature Protection; Prepared by Barbara L, Dugelby for Wildlands Network EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

CLIMATE CHANGE AND CONNECTIVITY:Toward a Strategy for Nature Protection; Prepared by Barbara L, Dugelby for Wildlands Network FULL REPORT

Models are commonly used to identify lands that will best maintain the ability of wildlife to move between wildland blocks through matrix lands after the remaining matrix has become incompatible with wildlife movement. By PAUL BEIER, DANIEL R. MAJKA, AND WAYNE D. SPENCER

The rarity or absence of highly interactive species leaves a functional void that can trigger linked changes leading to degraded or simplified ecosystems. By MICHAEL E. SOULÉ JAMES A. ESTES, JOEL BERGER, AND CARLOS MARTINEZ DEL RIO

The combination of habitat loss and landscape fragmentation poses one of the greatest threats to biodiversity conservation.By Gary M. Tabor and Katie Meiklejohn

By: Katie Meiklejohn, Rob Ament & Gary Tabor confusion about how best to implement connectivity and employ habitat corridors on the ground stems in part from a generalized lack of clarity about what we mean when we talk about protecting ‘corridors’ and ‘landscape connectivity.

Assessing and Creating Linkages within and beyond protected areas. A Quick Guide for Protected Area Practitioners:  By WCS, TNC CBD